Creating nameserver host records

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This article covers setting up your own nameservers for a domain of your choosing. This is typically needed by customers who are migrating from shared hosting or another provider, where the DNS was handled by a separate system.

If the server has a management plan with Servers Australia, we'll take care of all this for you. Otherwise, self-managed servers will need to go through setting up their own nameservers, if they want their server to handle the DNS.

1. Adding Address Host Records

Start by adding the A records to your domain. These A records will associate your nameserver names with your server. You can use any naming scheme you want. If you're unsure, the most common schemes are ns1.yourdomain.com and ns2.yourdomain.com. They would be setup like this:

ns1.yourdomain.com -> <your-server-ip-address>
ns2.yourdomain.com -> <your-server-ip-address>

2. Glue Records

Before you can assign your nameservers as your domain's official nameservers, the central domain registry needs to know about your nameservers. Basically, the registry needs to know each of the names of your nameservers along with their IP addresses. These are called Glue Records.

Find the place at your registrar where you can configure these. Many registrars will simply refer to them as Glue Records. A few may label them more abstractly, referring to "configuring nameservers with IPs", "host summary", "nameserver registration", or something similar.

Whatever it's called, you need to enter each nameserver name along with the IP you assigned to that address.

The new nameservers will shortly be available to use. A simple way to test is just to ping the host address of your new servers and see if they resolve to the correct IP address:

[root@server ~]# ping ns1.server.com -n
PING ns1.server.com (127.0.0.1) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from 127.0.0.1: icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.088 ms
64 bytes from 127.0.0.1: icmp_seq=2 ttl=64 time=0.069 ms
64 bytes from 127.0.0.1: icmp_seq=3 ttl=64 time=0.076 ms
 
So long as you are receiving replies from the server IP you set it to, you can be confident that DNS requests will be going to the server you've set.

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